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Easy Ways to Clean Up After Your Cats

Cats are cute but they can be messy. Whether it’s endless shedding, litter tracked everywhere, or stepping on a hairball, these elegant creatures are not always the tidiest roommates. Thankfully, having a cat doesn’t have to be a chore. Here are some ways to minimize the mess and keep your house neat and clean. Shedding With the exception of a few breeds, like the Sphynx and Devon Rex, all cats shed, some more so than others. One way to decrease shedding is to brush your cat regularly. Brushing your cat on a regular basis removes dead hair, prevents tangles, is enjoyable to your cat, and decreases shedding. Of course, even with brushing, fur may still end up everywhere. If you are tired of vacuuming hair every day, consider getting a robot vacuum. Robot vacuums, can make your life a lot easier. It can be programmed to run several times a day, offers multiple cleaning modes, and will automatically recharge when the battery is low. Robot vacuums do all the work for you so shedding is no longer a chore. Litter Litter can be messy and smelly, but it doesn’t have to be. Choose a high-quality litter, like ökocat, to absorb and neutralize smelly odors. ökocat is made from reclaimed wood and has superior odor control without added chemicals, dyes or fragrances. ökocat comes in different formulations to suit your cat’s tastes. To make kitty clean-up easier, ökocat makes their Less Mess Clumping Low-Tracking, Mini Pellets Wood Cat Litter. This litter is all-natural so it’s a cleaner, healthier litter for your cat and you! The low tracking formula helps keep litter in the box where it belongs. For added mess protection, use a litter mat to trap any loose litter pellets. Hairballs Every cat parent can relate to sleepily walking to the bathroom at night only to suddenly step on a warm, squishy hairball with their barefoot. Unless you have a hairless Sphynx cat, hairballs are the inevitable price we pay to have such clean pets. Cats naturally keep clean by licking and grooming themselves fastidiously. Unfortunately, hairballs result when cats ingest their fur and regurgitate it. You can reduce hairball production by brushing your cat regularly. You can also give them over-the-counter hairball medication which coats the ingested hair, making it easier to pass through their gastrointestinal tract. You can also consider switching your cat to a cat food formulated to help reduce hairballs. Accidents Anyone who has cats can attest that they can be messy roommates. Whether it’s litter box accidents, hairballs, or vomiting, it is inevitable that you will need to clean up after your cat. Besides cleaning up the accident, it is important to use the right product. Choose a cleaning product that is safe to use around your pet and that is formulated to neutralize pet odors. For example, urine smell can remain even if it seems completely cleaned-up. To prevent your cat from having another accident because they can still smell the urine, use a product that neutralizes rather than covers up the smell. House Cleaning Advice Just a word of caution regarding cleaning and pets, you need to be careful with cleaning products around your pets. Always keep them stored safely away from pets and children and remember if you clean the floor or counter, make sure it’s dry before you let your pets walk on it. Remember cats often lick their feet and can ingest any chemicals that get on their paws. Cats can be messy, but they give us so much love and joy…they are worth it. With the right products cleaning up after your cats doesn’t have to be hard.    
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How to Easily Reduce Your Pet's Carbon Pawprint

April 22nd is Earth Day, our yearly reminder to reflect upon how our actions impact the planet. However, as pet parents, we need to also think about how we can reduce our pet’s carbon pawprint. How can we ensure that our pet is eco-friendly?  Waste Management Anyone who has ever had a pet knows that pets make lots of waste. Whether you are picking it up, or scooping it, it is estimated that 10 million tons of waste from pets fill landfills every year. How can we make a difference? If you have a dog, use biodegradable poop bags instead of plastic bags to pick up your dog’s poop. Even better, use an in-ground waste disposal system. In-ground waste disposal systems are mini septic systems that allow you to dispose of your dog’s waste right in your back yard. There are several companies that sell kits you can buy to create your own environmentally-friendly dog waste disposal system. If you have a cat, switch from a clay-based litter to a biodegradable litter like ökocat to cut down on the estimated 2 million tons of clay litter that end up in landfills yearly. Learn how to compost ökocat litter here.   Don’t Pollute Always pick up after your pet. Besides being inconsiderate, leaving your pet’s waste behind can pollute water sources from runoff. Follow the backpacker’s motto and pack out what you pack in and leave only footprints (or pawprints) behind.   Buy Green Buying green can include purchasing products made from recycled or sustainable materials, or buying products that are chemical-free. Nowadays, you can buy beds made from reclaimed memory foam scraps and recycled plastic water bottles, or leashes and collars made from sustainably grown hemp. You can purchase ökocat litter that is made fragrance and chemical-free. Buying chemical-free products is not only good for the environment, but better for you and your pet.  Read more going green tips Buy in Bulk Buying pet food and pet supplies in bulk not only saves money, it also conserves fuel and lowers emissions by saving you extra trips to the store.   Pet Overpopulation Make sure your pet isn’t adding to the pet over-population problem by having your pets spayed or neutered.   Adopt a Shelter Pet Don’t forget about your local animal shelter if you are thinking about getting a pet. There are lots of “recycled pets” that need a good home. While adopting one of these deserving pets may not lower emissions or save fuel, it can save a life. By adopting these simple tips, you and your pet can live green and make the planet a better place.
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Top Rabbit Ailments and How to Prevent Them

Did you know that February is Adopt-a-Rabbit Month? While rabbits make great pets, many people do not realize the commitment of being a rabbit parent. Rabbits can live 8 to 12 years. To make sure that your bunny has a long and healthy life, you will need to provide a nutritious diet, proper housing, and become familiar with their health issues. Here are some of their most common health problems.   Overgrown teeth Rabbits’ teeth grow continuously. Unfortunately, this means that if they do not wear them down, their teeth can become sharp and overgrown. This can cause trauma to the cheeks and tongue and be painful. In severe cases, the front incisors can get so long that they curl around and prevent a rabbit from closing their mouth and even eating. So how do you know if your rabbit’s teeth are too long? Rabbits with dental problems often stop eating. If you notice your rabbit’s face is wet or they aren’t eating like they used to, be sure to check their teeth or see your veterinarian. The best way to prevent your rabbit from having overgrown teeth is by making sure your rabbit always has access to fresh hay, like carefresh Timothy Hay from chewy, and toys to gnaw on. Chewing hay, or gnawing on toys, helps wear down teeth and prevents them from getting too long.       Upper Respiratory Illnesses Respiratory infections are common in rabbits, especially when rabbits are housed in crowded stressful conditions. Likewise, rabbits kept in dirty enclosures with inadequate ventilation are more susceptible to these types of infections.  Pasteurellosis is the most common causes of bacterial upper respiratory infections in domestic rabbits and its often referred to as “snuffles.” It is highly contagious and spread through sneezing, coughing and direct contact. It causes an inflammation of the mucous membranes and lungs and left untreated can lead to pneumonia. The typical signs of an upper respiratory infection in rabbits are: runny nose, nasal or eye discharge, sneezing and coughing, and decreased appetite. Rabbits wipe their noses with their front feet, so sometimes people will notice their bunny has wet matted fu on their front legs. Infected rabbits require treatment with antibiotics and supportive care.   Gastrointestinal Stasis For many years, it was believed that rabbits stopped eating due to intestinal blockage caused by hairballs from excessive grooming. This condition was often referred to as “wool block.” However, we now know that it is normal for rabbits to have some amount of hair in their stomach since they are fastidious groomers. When rabbits stop eating, it is usually caused by gastrointestinal (GI) stasis rather than true blockage. GI stasis refers to slowing of the passage of food through the gastrointestinal tract. Veterinarians now believe that GI stasis in rabbits is caused by a change in the intestinal bacterial, also known as gut microbiome. These bacteria are beneficial and help a rabbit digest its food. When rabbits develop GI stasis, they stop eating, stop passing stool, become bloated, and can die if untreated. Treatment involves IV fluids, syringe feeding if the rabbit is not eating, antibiotics if there is an infection, and drugs to speed up gut motility. The risk of GI stasis can be reduced by feeding your rabbit hay and a high-fiber diet and by exercise your rabbit to stimulate gut motility.     Ear Mites Ear mites are a common parasite seen in rabbits. Rabbits with ear mites shake and scratch at their ears. In addition, affected animals usually have thick, dry, brownish crusty discharge in one or both ears. Ear mites are highly contagious from rabbit to rabbit and can lead to a head tilt if left untreated. Treatment is simple and involves an injection or topical medication.   Ulcerative Pododermatitis Ulcerative pododermatitis, commonly called “sore hocks,” is an infection of the soles of the rear feet. It occurs when rabbits develop pressure sores on their rear feet that then become infected. This occurs more frequently in overweight rabbits that are housed on wire-floor cages. Urine-soaked droppings and dirty bedding create the perfect breeding ground for bacteria that can colonize irritated and inflamed skin leading to infection. Signs of ulcerative pododermatitis include: abnormal walking, limping, and sitting in a peculiar position with weight shifted off the rear feet. Treatment involves moving affected animals to a clean cage with a solid floor and soft bedding. Topical and oral antibiotics are used to treat the infection.    Myxomatosis Myxomatosis, often called “big head disease,” is a deadly viral disease seen in domestic rabbits. It is caused by the myxoma virus, which is a type of pox virus and is transmitted by mosquitos, biting flies, ticks, fleas and direct contact. Rabbits with myxomatosis often have nasal and eye discharge, nasal swelling, fevers and lethargy. Unfortunately, there is no treatment and the disease is usually fatal. The best way to prevent this horrible disease is to protect them from the insects that transmit the disease. Talk to your veterinarian about the best parasite control measures for your rabbit.   When to call your veterinarian Like people, rabbits can become sick, but unlike us, they can’t tell you when they don’t feel well. In addition, they are very good at hiding signs of illness, a trait that was necessary for their wild rabbit cousins. So how do you know when your bunny is sick? Common signs of illness in rabbits include: nasal discharge, congestion, eye discharge, lethargy, poor appetite, diarrhea or reduced stool. If you notice any of these signs, notify your veterinarian right away.   Prevention So how can you keep your rabbit healthy? Make sure they are fed a nutritious diet that includes fresh hay daily. For more information about what to feed your rabbit, check-out this article. Rabbits also need to kept in a well-ventilated clean habitat with proper bedding and a litter box, using carefresh® bedding or litter. Soiled bedding should be removed daily and entire habitats should be cleaned weekly. Just like dogs and cats, rabbits should be spayed and neutered and have annual veterinary check-ups to ensure they are healthy and up-to-date on preventatives.  >>> Learn more about rabbit care, bonding and playtime    By feeding your rabbit a nutritious diet, housing them in a clean and tidy habitat, looking-out for common health problems, and taking them to the veterinarian regularly, you can give your rabbit the best chance to live a long healthy life.            
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Learn All About Feline Diabetes: Prevention, Symptoms, Treatment and Diet

November is American Diabetes Month®, and humans aren’t the only ones at risk of developing diabetes. Approximately 1 in 200 cats in the United States suffer from diabetes.  What is diabetes? Diabetes mellitus, commonly called just diabetes, is a disorder that occurs when the body is unable to regulate the amount of sugar in the bloodstream. There are two types of diabetes, type-1 and type-2. Type-1 diabetes, also known as insulin dependent diabetes, occurs when the body is unable to produce insulin. Insulin is a hormone released when blood sugar levels are high, called hyperglycemia, such as after meals. Insulin directs cells in the body to move sugar out of the blood stream and into cells for storage or energy. Type-2 diabetes, also known as non-insulin dependent diabetes or insulin resistance, occurs when the body becomes less responsive to the effects of insulin. Even though insulin is still being produced, blood sugars levels become elevated. Regardless of the cause, both forms of diabetes result in chronically elevated blood sugar levels that damage capillaries, the smallest blood vessels in the body. The damage to capillaries may lead to different complications. What causes diabetes in pets?  Diabetes is influenced by both inherited and environmental factors. Genetics seem to be an important risk factor in dogs, and certain breeds, like Keeshonds and Samoyeds, are more likely to develop diabetes. Age is another important risk factor. Though it can affect animals of any age, it is more common in middle-aged and older animals.  Obesity is a major risk factor for type-2 diabetes, which is more common in cats. Fat tissue impairs the effects of insulin and leads to insulin resistance. Unfortunately, obesity in pets is becoming more prevalent. It is estimated that more than half of all cats in the United States are overweight and at risk of developing diabetes. Fortunately, diet and weight loss play an important role in the treatment of type-2 diabetes.       How is diabetes treated or managed? While there is no cure for diabetes, it is a manageable condition. Just like diabetes in people, diabetes in pets can be controlled with medications and lifestyle changes. The goal of treatment is to stabilize blood sugar levels by preventing them from getting too high or too low. This can be achieved with some combination of diet, insulin and at-home monitoring. There are several different types of insulin available with different durations of action, your veterinarian will assess your pet to determine which type of insulin will be best for your particular pet. In addition to insulin, diet and weight loss are just as important when it comes to treating diabetes in pets. Recent nutritional studies show that switching to a low-carbohydrate and high-protein canned food diet is the most effective dietary routine for most diabetic cats. Your veterinarian will work with you to determine what if any nutritional changes are necessary for your cat. Weight loss is also important because obesity is a common cause of insulin resistance. Fatty tissue releases factors that impair the effects of insulin. To promote weight loss, you should increase your cat’s daily exercise (yes you can get your cat to exercise), in addition to following your veterinarian’s dietary suggestions.   Photo by Piotr Musioł on Unsplash What are the common signs and symptoms of diabetes in cats?  The classic symptoms of diabetes are: Increased thirst Increased appetite Increased urination Lethargic Weight loss Dull coat It is important to be aware of the signs and symptoms of diabetes so that you can promptly seek veterinary care if you notice any of these in your pets. Of course, it’s important to mention that cats are very adept at hiding illness so these symptoms may be difficult to recognize initially. That’s why regular veterinary check-ups are so important. Annual examinations and diagnostic tests help to uncover diseases, like diabetes, early when they are typically easier to treat or manage.   How do you know if your cat has diabetes?  Diabetes can only be diagnosed by a veterinarian. If you think your cat may have diabetes, see your veterinarian immediately. Your veterinarian can diagnose diabetes with simple blood and urine tests. These fast and easy diagnostic tests allow your veterinarian to detect abnormally high levels of sugar in your pet’s bloodstream and also look for the presence of sugar or sugar breakdown products in their urine.   What’s the treatment?  Fortunately, diabetes is a treatable disease. The goal of treatment is to avoid the complications of diabetes by providing stable blood sugar levels. This can be achieved with some combination of diet, weight loss and insulin. There are several different types of insulin available with different durations of action. Your veterinarian will determine which type of insulin will be best for your particular pet. If your cat is overweight, your veterinarian will likely change their diet. Recent nutritional studies have found that switching to a low-carbohydrate and high-protein canned food diet is the most effective dietary intervention for diabetic cats. To promote weight loss, follow your veterinarian’s feeding recommendations and encourage active play.  With the right medications, diet and weight loss, diabetes can be controlled.  It is important to realize that if caught early and treated with insulin and diet, diabetic cats can go into remission, which means their blood sugar levels, also known as blood glucose levels, remain stable for more than a month without insulin injections or oral medications. Studies have shown that diabetic cats have remission rates that have been reported to range from 15%–100%. Predictors of diabetic remission in cats include achieving excellent blood sugar control within 6 months of diagnosis and regular home monitoring. Even if your cat does not go into remission, the goal of diabetes treatment is to reduce symptoms and avoid complications of uncontrolled diabetes.     Take home message Diabetes is an increasingly common problem in older cats. Become familiar with the signs and symptoms of diabetes and watch for their development in your pet. Take your cat to your veterinarian for regular examinations and screening tests. Remember it is always best to catch diseases early before they become advanced and lead to complications. If your cat has diabetes, remember that diabetes is a manageable disease and with treatment cats with diabetes can live long healthy lives.  FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT DIABETES SPEAK WITH YOUR VETERINARIAN.  The makers of okocat® natural litter are not only dedicated to making the best cat litter, they are also committed to helping cats live longer, healthier lives. By providing educational articles like this one, they hope to educate pet parents about important cat health topics.    
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Top tips to keep your cat safe at home!

A cat’s insatiable curiosity is an incredibly endearing feline trait. While it is a sign of their intelligence, their inquisitive nature can also get them into trouble. After all, there is a reason for the saying “curiosity killed the cat.” So what can pet parents do to protect their feline friends? How can they cat-proof their home? To keep their cats safe, pet parents need to recognize and address these common household dangers.   Kitchen and Laundry Room Cats have a knack for getting into things. Unfortunately, the kitchen or laundry room can be a hazardous place for curious kitties. Keep appliance doors closed: If your cat gets into a grocery bag or purse, it’s cute. If your cat gets into the dishwasher, oven, washer, or dryer, it can be lethal. Animals have been hurt or even killed when someone turns on the appliance without realizing their pet is inside. Preventing these tragedies is simple: always keep lids and doors closed and check before turning on the appliance. Don’t leave food unattended: Cats also have an amazing sense of smell and seem to know where to find tasty food. Keep foods that are toxic to cats, such as chocolate and alcohol, out of their reach. Also keep them away from poultry bones that can splinter and get lodged in their gastrointestinal tract. To avoid these problems, keep unattended food off tables and counters and dispose of leftovers in a covered garbage can to prevent garbage surfing. Keep cleaners tucked away: Be sure to store detergents and household cleaners safely out of your feline’s reach.   Living Room At first glance, the living room may seem like a safe haven. Unfortunately, first impressions can be deceiving. Place breakables out of reach: Our carefully placed decorations can also draw the unwanted attention of our curious cats. Bright, shiny, and especially fragile objects seem to beckon our curious feline friends to play with them. If knocked over and shattered, glass and ceramic fragments are razor sharp and can cut unsuspecting paws. Don’t leave lit candles unsupervised: Little paws can do more than break fragile decorations. Lit candles that are knocked over can burn your pet, or even worse, cause a household fire. Know which plants are feline-friendly: Even decorative plants can be deadly. Before you bring any plants or flowers to your home, check to make sure they are not poisonous to your cat. Lilies, for example, are highly toxic to cats and consumption of any part of the plant can lead to kidney failure and death. Keep electrical cords out of reach: They can electrocute your pet if chewed upon or strangle your pet if they get tangled in the cord. Check under your recliners: Finally, before your sit down and relax in your recliner or rocking chair, always make sure your cat hasn’t curled up beneath it.    Bathroom The bathroom ranks as the smallest room in a typical house, but what it lacks in square footage it makes up for in hazards. Toss the floss: What’s good for your teeth may not be good for your cat. Flossing may be what the dentist ordered, but flossing can actually be dangerous to our cats. Cats are often drawn to linear objects like yarn and dental floss. Ingesting a linear object can cause an intestinal obstruction that can be fatal if not treated with emergent surgery. Floss to keep your teeth and gums healthy. Just remember to dispose of your floss in a covered garbage can. Don’t leave the curler on: Lastly, be careful with hot hairdryers and curling irons that can burn an unsuspecting, curious cat’s nose.   Garage The garage is usually the most dangerous place in your home for your cat. Garages are stockpiles of hazardous chemicals, pesticides and fertilizers. Be wary of chemicals: Make sure all chemicals are safely put away. Some chemicals, like antifreeze, have an appealing sweet smell that can entice a curious pet for a taste. Unfortunately even a mere taste can be lethal. Safely store your pesticides: Insecticides, rodenticides, and fertilizers can also be toxic. Pesticides are the most dangerous because they are often sweetened or scented to attract pests and cats can become their unintended victims.   You can never protect your pet from every possible hazard. However, you can take these measures to make your home safer for your pets and protect them from these common household dangers. Following these suggestions can help keep your cats safe and prevent unscheduled emergency visits to the veterinarian. ökocat is not only dedicated to making the best cat litter, but also committed to helping cats live longer, healthier lives by educating pet parents about important cat health topics.
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